Lung Cancer - Stand Up To Cancer
VideoPlay Video
COMMON Stand Up To Cancer Ambassador
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States.

Fact:
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States.

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States.

Fact:
Over 25,000 Black Americans are diagnosed with lung cancer each year.

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States.

Fact:
The rate of death among Black Americans from lung cancer is disproportionately high.

VideoPlay Video
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States.

Fact:
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States.

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States.

Fact:
Over 25,000 Black Americans are diagnosed with lung cancer each year.

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States.

Fact:
The rate of death among Black Americans from lung cancer is disproportionately high.

COMMON Stand Up To Cancer Ambassador

Change IS possible, and it starts with you. If you or a loved one have been diagnosed with lung cancer, a clinical trial may be the right option.

 

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT CLINICAL TRIALS

There are two main types of lung cancer, and early detection is crucial for both. People diagnosed with lung cancer may worry that they won’t get the support they need because of the stigma associated with cigarette smoking.

 

But the truth is, lung cancer is a disease that can affect anyone, and most people who are diagnosed have either quit smoking years prior, or have never smoked at all.

Non-small cell lung cancer

Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)
Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer, making up about 80 to 85% of diagnoses. There are three main subtypes of NSCLC: adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and large cell carcinoma. Although they start from different types of lung cells, these subtypes get grouped together because treatment and outlook are often similar.

Small cell lung cancer (SCLC)
Small cell lung cancer (SCLC), sometimes called “oat-cell” cancer, makes up about 10 to 15% of diagnoses. This type of cancer usually grows and spreads faster than NSCLC.

Small cell lung cancer

Racial and ethnically diverse communities can often be medically underserved due to many factors including proximity to medical facilities, transportation challenges or inability to take time off work, or language, financial or insurance barriers. Additionally, race-based inequities ingrained in the health care system can contribute to mistrust or a sense of not being welcomed or listened to.

However, there is now an effort across many communities, organizations and health care providers to reduce disparities in health care, including in clinical trials. And, in addition, clinical trials are now safer and more patient-oriented compared to those in the past. Here are some things to know when participating in a trial:

 

Trials are conducted to find new treatments that are better than the existing treatment or to create a standard treatment if one does not already exist.

The safety and wellbeing of the participant is the priority. There is a high level of monitoring that takes place during a trial, which means the clinical team keeps a close eye on every participant.

Every clinical trial is reviewed by an Institutional Review Board (IRB) whose primary objective is to protect the interests and welfare of the patients.

 

Although the Black community is more likely to develop advanced lung cancer than any other racial or ethnic group, there are options available, and clinical trials may offer access to the latest and most promising research.

 

When it comes to a lung cancer diagnosis, you need to know the facts, and a clinical trial may be the best option for you or a loved one. Get more information on clinical trials by talking to your health care provider and visiting StandUpToCancer.org/ClinicalTrials.

 

For more information about screening, diagnosis and other resources visit StandUpToCancer.org/ForPatientsAndCaregivers.

LEARN MORE

Sign up below for more information about Stand Up To Cancer

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY

Sign up to receive emails from Stand Up To Cancer.
   Please leave this field empty
Please validate the captcha
Stand Up to Cancer

Thanks for signing up!
You will hear from us soon.