Research Teams - Stand Up To Cancer

Research Teams

SU2C Convergence 3.1416 Research Team: Molecular and Biophysical Definition of Tumor-Host Interactions and Impact on Tumorigenesis and Therapeutic Response

Grant term: January 2021-December 2023

This SU2C Convergence Research Team is seeking to provide an understanding of the mechanisms regulating the tumor-host interaction interface and their effects on host immunity, tumorigenesis, and therapeutic response.

Supported by:

ABOUT THIS TEAM’S RESEARCH

This team seeks to provide an understanding of the mechanisms regulating the tumor-host interaction interface and their effects on host immunity, tumorigenesis, and therapeutic response. The aim is to uncover molecular and biophysical signatures of tumor interactions with its microenvironment through expertise of team members: development of novel

1) cancer organoid models,

2) microfluidic devices for precise biophysical measurements in organoid or single-cell biological systems,

3) proteomic and lipidomic methods for characterizing host immune signaling and spatiotemporal responses, and

4) dynamic metabolic profiling methods in cancer models. Information encoded in organoid transcriptomes, proteomes, interactomes, surfaceomes, lipidomes, metabolomes, metabolic flux, secretomes, and biophysical properties will be integrated to uncover drivers of tumorigenesis and potentially new therapeutic targets.

These analyses will be facilitated by the development of a series of sensitive and accurate mass spectrometry (MS)-based methods for dynamic protein analyses and metabolite imaging in 3D organoid systems. The design of thermal proximity coaggregation MS for human and mouse organoid systems will allow the team to monitor assembly/disassembly of protein complexes at a systems-level and discover which functional protein units participate in response to cell-intrinsic or -extrinsic factors or to conventional, targeted, and emerging therapies. Rapid organoid responses to a changing microenvironment will be further modeled and analyzed by developing a chemostat that will allow real-time imaging and high-throughput secretome and metabolome analyses. A major focus of the team will be on High-Grade Serous Tubo-Ovarian Carcinoma (HGSC), a prevalent and deadly form of cancer. Multi-omic analyses and biophysical measurements will be used to investigate genotypically-distinct organoids and their impact on HGSC evolution, communication with the microenvironment, and therapeutic sensitivity.

Detecting Gastric Cancer

MEET THE TEAM

The top scientists and researchers on the SU2C Convergence Research Team: Molecular and Biophysical Definition of Tumor-Host Interactions and Impact on Tumorigenesis and Therapeutic Response come from a variety of backgrounds and disciplines, which leads them to great insights upon collaboration. Learn more about the SU2C Convergence Research Team: Molecular and Biophysical Definition of Tumor-Host Interactions and Impact on Tumorigenesis and Therapeutic Response

Team Members

 

Ileana Cristea, PhD
Princeton University
Leader

Shawn Davidson, PhD
Princeton University
Team Member

Scott Manalis, PhD
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Team Member

Benjamin Neel, MD, PhD
New York University Langone
Team Member

Project Manager
Alice Lustig
Stand Up To Cancer

TEAM PROGRESS UPDATES

Stand Up To Cancer’s research projects are designed to foster collaborative, swift translational research. The hallmarks of these efforts include rigorous application and selection procedures, sufficient funding to allow scientists to focus on the objectives of the grant, and reviews by senior scientists every six months. These reviews help the investigators capitalize on the latest findings, address potential roadblocks, and collaboratively evolve as the science requires. For this SU2C Convergence Team, please click on the link below to see summaries of their research results so far.

TEAM PROGRESS UPDATES

PUBLICATIONS

This Team started its work in 2021, and publications will be posted when available.

Clinical Trials Referrals

Cancer clinical trials allow researchers to study innovative and potentially life-saving new treatments. The goal is to find treatments that are better than what’s currently available; in fact, the therapies offered to today’s cancer patients were almost all studied and made possible by people participating in clinical trials. But many cancer clinical trials aren’t completed because not enough people take part.

At StandUpToCancer.org/ClinicalTrials, you’ll find clinical trial information, answers to common questions, and a free clinical trial finder tool.

LEARN MORE

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